CREATOR OF COLOUR IN YOUR LIFE AND INTERNATIONALLY ACCLAIMED ARTIST TO HOLD EXHIBITION AT RED HILL GALLERY

Paintings from highly-esteemed artist, Graeme Stevenson OAM, will be featured in his Major Solo Exhibition at Brisbane’s Red Hill Gallery on Friday 1 December 2017.

Originally from New South Wales, Graeme Stevenson left a promising career as a paramedic when he was a young man to attain his pilot’s licence and travel the globe. With a passion for wildlife, nature and natural forms, Stevenson started creating art of the local flora and fauna during his travels. His lifelong interests in birds lead to his renowned illustrations for the book The Atlas of Parrots, which is still featured in the Natural History Museums of London, New York and Paris.

Once referred to as a “Master Artist” by US Art magazine, Stevenson is well known for his creation of the popular TV show, Colour in Your Life. The show features artists from around the globe and the program has helped to promote the fine art industry throughout the world. Stevenson also founded the Paint your Life Foundation in 2015, and on Australia Day 2017 he was awarded the Order of Australia Medal for his contributions to the Arts within our borders and abroad.

His paintings reflect influences of realism, expressionism and surrealism, and have been purchased by numerous art collectors and celebrities, including the former US President Bill Clinton. The artwork created for Stevenson’s upcoming exhibition ‘The Attitude of Colour’ reflects on things he believes are still most important in our world, the beauty of the natural world and feminine form.

Red Hill Gallery is honoured to be showcasing the outstanding artwork from entrepreneur and talented artist Graeme Stevenson OAM. ‘The Attitude of Colour’ will be on Exhibition from Friday 1 December and will conclude on Sunday 17 December 2017.

©  Red Hill Gallery

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‘SMALL WINDOWS’ BIG VISION

Paintings from the highly-cultured and renowned Australian artist, Regina Noakes, will be featured in her new exhibition Small Windows at Brisbane’s Red Hill Gallery, 61 Musgrave Road, Red Hill from Friday 3 November 2017.

An award-winning, well-travelled and experienced artist, Regina Noakes’ career spans over 21 years and 45 solo exhibitions. Her work has been featured in Australia, Italy, USA and Malaysia, and is influenced by an array of sources – religious and tribal, Romanesque and Mughal art, and her own life experiences.

Regina’s artwork is governed by a surrealist and lyrical style, which has been a part of her creative vision since she first came in contact with a Surrealism magazine at the age of sixteen. With an appreciation for the ‘marvellous’, and the conflict between internal and external worlds, it is her instinct to create figurative work of great symbolism and emotional richness.

“Noakes achieves this by setting up a calmly ethereal parallel world, often through the masterful use of colour. Everything in this other place is alive with resonance and filled with swirling energy. No wonder the eyes of the model are always slightly bulbous with a kind of childish wonderment.” ~ John T. Spike, Art Critic

Red Hill Gallery is pleased to present this exquisite new body of artwork from an original artist such as Regina Noakes, and to offer art enthusiasts the unique opportunity to view and own paintings of remarkable narrative quality.

‘Small Windows’ is on show until Sunday 19 November and is not to be missed.

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Vale ~ Glenys Lindsay ~ Passed over November 13, 2017

Remembering her Life from Dean Rusling I first met Glenys about 25 years ago; she rocked into the Foundry one day with a job to do for her and that was the start of many adventures with her Work. At that time she was a client but as the years went on, like a lot of my Clients, we became friends, except I feel Glenys had become a best friend. She had spent 20 years entwining herself within the fabric of the Foundry, my family, my kids and my grandkids. For years she worked for Brisbane Council in the Land and Parks (I think it was) and then around 2006 stopped work to be a full time carer for her very sick Mum. After the passing of her Mum she did go back to work for a while but then opted to retire early.

She was bit of a collector too, investing in other fine arts as well. Glenys’ other pastime was simply going to the plaza: lol! She had so many little trinkets at home, and her back yard had many a windmill, or some Solar charged light gizmo thingy for the night time display in her back yard, or something hanging off her clothes line where the wind would generate a movement in the piece.

My trips to Glenys’ place always resulted in coming away with more than I took there; there was always a bag of chips or nuts or lollies plus a drink for my trip home! Her studio was her dining room table, always something going on there. The table was always full of jars of brushes and sculpting tools; eyes and bits and pieces lying around with bits of wire etc. But, undoubtedly, you couldn’t have had a meal ever at the table for Sculpture accessories. And then, always right in the middle of the table with a bag over it, was her next work of art being produced in clay.

Her sculpting career has as per every other sculptor I’m sure – had it’s up and downs from : “I can’t sculpt, my work is crap…bla bla bla” to the always “well, I mean it this time Dean: I’m giving up sculpting, I’m not doing it anymore” – my answers were always “Ok! What are you making next”.

Glenys’ main Gallery has always been Redhill Gallery where she was much loved and respected. We even had a joint exhibition one year there at the gallery. She has done commissions for Redhill with the most prominent one being a large hairy nose wombat. She also did a large sculpture of a koala which sits outside the entrance to the Noosa National Park. Glenys was always involved in sculpture comps and our rivalry over trying to beat each other was always worth a laugh.

Her generosity outweighed everything I think. She gave a way as much sculpture as she sold. She loved the fact that someone would like her Work and thought it worthy of a purchase. I think out of all of it, that was the buzz in her life – that someone wanted her Sculptures: she always felt they weren’t good enough. Yet I think, if you tallied up her achievements by sales, she did make professional status as a sculptor. I felt she was very knowledgeable as well, across a broad spectrum, not just about art. We would converse on many different subjects at length. She had travelled a fair bit in her life; going to different countries checking out Sculpture wherever she went.

But man, could she talk on the phone! She would always finish by “well, I better let you get back to work” – which would follow with another question! Haha.

But above all though, Glenys was generous to whoever came into her life, whether it was her neighbours of many years, or the lawn mower man, or her own family, she was kind and forever helpful. I will miss her for sure. And even though the ever-present feeling of her still being here will pass, her memories for me will never go from my mind!

She has blessed my life for the good.

 

Written by Dean Rusling   ©  Red Hill Gallery

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A Love Affair with Provence ~ “Words of Love on a Palette of Provence”

My name is Pierre Bernabeu, I have the great pleasure of launching my book “Words of Love on a Palette of Provence” at Red Hill Gallery which I wrote for my wife, Louise. Our love started in 1964 when swimming in the Mediterranean sea, I noticed a pedal boat with 3 young women on board so I pretended I was drowning and saw the pedal boat coming towards me. On board a young woman gave me her hand and I instantly noticed her blue eyes and I said to myself I have to know more about her. In 1967 we got married and the rest is history.

We got married in Nice, South of France. We left France for New Caledonia, in 1970 our daughter Barbara was born and in 1973 our son, Gregory. During that time I had an interest for movie making, I went back to France to get my editing certificate, back in New Caledonia the political situation had changed and we thought there was no future in that country. My wife wanted to go back to France, I said ok but what if we stayed in Australia for 3 years and that’s what we did.

I was working in Sydney at Colorfilm as a film synchroniser. I worked on films such as Gallipoli, Mad Max and Man from Snowy river and painted in the attic in our house in Paddington. After 3 years it was time to leave Australia as promised, we stayed in France 3 months and came back to Sydney. We moved to the Gold Coast bought a house and settled definitely in this beautiful country we call home.

I had my first exhibition in Noosa than Red Hill Gallery in Brisbane, Gold Coast, Melbourne, Sydney, New Caledonia, Paris and Spain. Our daughter found love, got married and gave us our wonderful grandson, Oliver. Our son, Gregory is still searching for someone special.

Having suffered a stroke a few years back has slowed me down but hasn’t taken away my passion for my wife, family and  painting. I decided to write “Words of Love on a Palette of Provence” for my beautiful wife. I always say she is the best wife I ever had and for our 40th wedding anniversary the all family joined us on the P&O Pacific Sun where we renewed our vows. We danced to Ray Charles’ song Georgia, my son tied up some cans and wrote a “Just Married” sign behind my wheelchair. Back to our cabin and the rest is not your business.

I tell you a little secret to love, make sure you tell your love one the 3 words ” I love you ” when you go to bed and wake up and as many times as you want during the day. It will make for a long happy marriage, a few paintings and love words in between can’t hurt. I have had the great pleasure of publishing this book, life is short let’s live it to the fullest and enjoy every moment together. I hope my book will bring you joy and love.

Pierre

Please join the Red Hill Gallery team along with Pierre and his family on Saturday 25 November 2017 between 1 and 3pm for the launch and signing of his new book at Red Hill Gallery, 61 Musgrave Road, Red Hill, Brisbane.

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UPCOMING EVENTS AT RED HILL GALLERY, BRISBANE

October             STARR POP UP ~ FLEUR

Starr will be joining us in the gallery on Saturday 28th & Sunday 29th October with an exciting new collection of paintings inspired by her love of flowers.

November         Regina NOAKES EXHIBITION

In this exhibition I am exploring relationships, interaction and intimacy. Narrative is an important element in my work, sometimes with an ambiguous slant. Improvisation, fleeting moments, dreams, seeing things in layers, childhood and finding the unexpected are all preoccupations.”            Exhibition opens Friday 3 November

November         Pierre BERNABEU – BOOK LAUNCH

Pierre Bernabeu has always had a passion for his beloved Provence; join us in the gallery on Saturday 25 November from 1pm as Pierre talks about his exciting new book featuring romantic poems and images of his beautiful paintings.

 December         Graeme STEVENSON OAM EXHIBITION

Over his life, Graeme has had a love affair with life, nature, different countries and the general beauty of the world. His most recent body of work is a reflection of some of the things that are dear to him in life at the moment.   Exhibition opens 1 December

 December         Christmas ART GIFT MARKET

If you’re looking for something special, something unique for that someone special, then we have some fabulous gift ideas for Christmas from your favourite artists.

 Loretta Blake, Simone Schumacher, RW Allen, Katherine Wood, Keith Rowe, Zohar, Starr, Danielle McManus, Karen Atkins, Christine Reilly, Denise Murray, Pam Walpole, Jan Prior, Frances Luke, Christine Porter, Susan Blyton, Michelle Smith, Mel Brigg & more…..

 Please feel free to join our email database to receive information on our upcoming Exhibitions and Gallery News.

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FOUTH GENERATION OF THE BOYD DYNASTY, JAMIE BOYD TO EXHIBIT AT RED HILL GALLERY

Paintings from internationally acclaimed artist, the most prominent living member of the famous Boyd family dynasty, Jamie Boyd, will be featured in his new exhibition ‘From the Other Shore’ at Brisbane’s Red Hill Gallery from Friday 6 October 2017.

An established and experienced artist, Boyd’s practice is currently based in London, which he travels from on a regular basis to attend to exhibitions of his distinctive work held in Australia, England, Italy, Germany and Holland.

Talented from an early age, Boyd studied at the Michael Karolyi Foundation in Southern France and began working as a professional artist at the age of seventeen. His paintings are award-winning, spanning six decades and numerous exhibitions.

Jamie Boyd, son of the late Arthur Boyd AO and grandson of the late Merric Boyd, the fourth generation of the Boyd Family; is a master of colour and craft, using materials of any shape, colour or description to create some visually mesmerising pieces. His lyrical works are often created spontaneously, or as inspiration hits him:

 “One of the joys of painting in the open air, or as some may say ‘on the spot’ is the pleasure taking that captured scene back to the studio, not to copy but to use as a prompt to rekindle the original inspiration. A beautiful reminder of the emotional state as much as the time and place.”  – Jamie Boyd

“Red Hill Gallery is honoured to represent a gifted artist such as Jamie Boyd, and to offer the rare opportunity for art lovers to view and own paintings by Australian artistic royalty.”  – Margaret Campbell-Ryder (Director)

©  Red Hill Gallery

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Dean Reilly’s Public Hanging

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HARSH LANDSCAPES, ORGANIC SCULPTURES

Mel Brigg with his hauntingly beautiful collection of paintings depicting his love of nature, animals and the wide open spaces of Australia and South Africa- as well as Laurindo De Abreu Soto with “Diversity”, his latest collection of exquisite sculptures- will be exhibiting at Brisbane based Red Hill Gallery from Friday 8 September 2017.

South African born artist Mel Brigg has always said ‘I paint not because I want to, but because I must’. He has often been compelled to paint conveying his feelings and his message, as he believes painting is ‘a powerful way to make a statement about anything that moves you’. Drawing inspiration from the interior regions of Australia – the vastness and intensity of light, combined with the spirituality of the indigenous peoples – is a never ending source of subject matter for his work. Each of Brigg’s paintings is seemingly simple, yet highly skilled, and expansive in their vision.

Laurindo De Abreu Soto describes his practice like life itself – a dynamic and ever growing entity, which moves back and forth in time and ideas. His work as a sculptor is closely related to design and architecture, and is consequently very “object based”. As a sculptor, his main concern and field of practice is Space, in which the work of art serves as a boundary that allows us to appreciate that space. The sculptures presented in this exhibition are a continuation of his exploration into the possibilities of materials – such as fibreglass, plywood, and Laminex – along with their combinations and interplay.

Mel Brigg’s latest exhibition of emotive landscapes, and Laurindo De Abreu Soto’s collection of sculptures entitled “Diversity,” will open on Friday 8 September and continue until Sunday 24 September 2017 at Red Hill Gallery, 61 Musgrave Road, Red Hill, QLD.

©  Red Hill Gallery

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BRISBANE AND OTHER DESTINATIONS

David Hinchliffe continues to make his mark in the art world with sell-out exhibitions across the globe in New York, London, Paris and his hometown, Brisbane. On Saturday 12 August, Red Hill Gallery will open its doors showcasing the latest collection of stunning paintings by Hinchliffe.

David has always enjoyed the shapes, the noise and the shadows of city landscapes, as well as the seasonal colours of the ever changing landscape. Whether it’s the drama of the lower East Side in New York, the reflections in the canals of Venice, the romance of Parisian streets, the crowded pedestrian footpaths of Brisbane, or the breathtaking tree-lined streets near his home and studio.

My recent work deals with the urban environment in its many forms, in cities around the world as well as an abiding affinity with the Australian landscape. It is a response to light. I like the movement of light across a surface — whether it’s a valley, a river, a street or the human form. ~ David Hinchliffe

Red Hill Gallery is pleased to present this Major Solo Exhibition by Brisbane artist David Hinchliffe. Don’t miss this opportunity to see the artwork of this talented globetrotting Brisbane artist. “This exhibition follows many successful shows of David’s art all over the world. We are thrilled to show the people of his hometown, the incredible interpretations and atmospheric qualities that he manages to imbue in his canvases,” Gallery Director Margaret Campbell-Ryder said.

©  Red Hill Gallery

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Artist Q & A – ‘In the Flow’ by Katherine Wood

Catching up with the lovely Katherine Wood is always a pleasure, and we were super excited to see her latest body of work for ‘In the Flow’ currently exhibiting at Red Hill Gallery, 61 Musgrave Road, Red Hill Brisbane.

AC:  You’ve added some new paintings to the gallery for this new exhibition, being works of different animals with a figure climbing. Can you elaborate on the symbolism of the hiking man?

KW:  Katherine’s Symbiosis series depicts the idea of working with your subconscious (the animal) and that through the power of ones mind, one can accomplish anything (the human).

There is a natural force steering us; a desire, general energy or strong will. However, in most cases our subconscious mind stands in our way which produces doubt or negative thoughts.  This ‘doubt’ depicted by the confronting animal is something we are forever trying to tame.  Here the attention of the viewer is turned from the enormity of the animal (our fear) to the lone figure (confidently climbing and defiantly conquering it).  Although we are small in the bigger scheme of things, if we choose to remain strong, harness our positive energy and thoughts and remain reflective and be in the moment then our ‘fear’ can be mounted and that we can achieve anything.

Each work is of a limited edition giclee reproduction of a worldwide distribution of 60 each.

AC:  The colour palette of some of the new paintings in the collection are soft and subdued. Was this to create a certain mood for the paintings?

KW:  Primarily I use earthy colours with the use of the colours conveying an earthbound primordial quality.  These colours underline the expression of natural potency of the natural world and in  particular its atmospheric conditions.  The introduction of the recent subdued colour palette is softer in creating a more gentle energy that brings with it a sense of calm. It is what it is and everything is going to be okay. The sky is portrayed with blending brush strokes in a comingling of hues which capture the inconstant nature of the atmosphere which is juxtaposed with the earth that is painted in a thick and static manner which comments on the permanence of the earth.  Here again a play on the beautiful contrast of surety and change. Katherine continues to express the intangible into the visible, thereby bestowing the viewer with the means to explore emotions and sensations in an aesthetically alluring manner.  “In the midst of movement and chaos, keep stillness inside of you” Echart Tolle

 AC: Has moving from South Africa to Australia impacted the way you create art in a way you hadn’t initially anticipated?

KW:  Yes, definitely. In South Africa we lived in a small coastal town called Knysna. We renovated a gorgeous wooden cottage in a forest where my husband built my studio and both our daughters Satara and Meagan were born. Sadly last month Knysna was devastated by a fire, taking over 1000 homes in its wave of destruction.  Our home of over 10 years being one of them.  I feel subconsciously  I am no longer afraid and that I am ready to embrace our life here. My work has definitely. expanded in relation to subject matter. Introducing the theme of the ocean (being the symbol of change) and that of the animal “symbiosis” series (with the idea of conquering your fear). My work since being in Australia has definitely. become more experimental and confident and I feel like there is still so much I need to learn and do. I am so excited for the future here in Australia and so grateful my daughters get to live in such an incredible country.

AC:  What piece of advice have you been given that’s been most helpful to you?

KW: My high school art teacher told me to always remain true to my own style of art (not to try to please everybody) and not to try and be something that you not. I also love the advice of these quotes; “Everybody is a genius but if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree it will spend it’s whole life believing it is stupid” – Albert Einstein “You don’t have to explain anything to anybody about anything” –  Abraham Hicks  “Let your hard work be your voice” –  unknown “Storms make trees take deeper roots”  – Dolly Parton “The sign of intelligence is that you are constantly wandering. Idiots are always dead sure of every damn thing they are doing in life” – Vasudev

AC:  You often feature thick impasto textures in your paintings. What inspired you to create this theme in your pieces?

KW:  Canadian painter Lawren Harris once said, “Paintings come out of themselves.” I truly believe this and it is how I approach my work. Most of my paintings are spontaneous and they simply evolve from the process of painting. I like to work in layers. Creating ongoing, illusions of space. By using this thick impasto technique it reinforces the idea of space, breaking the very two dimensional quality of the canvas surface taking it almost into a 3D illusion reinstating the infinite and at the same time reaffirming that there is nowhere else other than the here and now – the final destination.  This texture pulls the viewer even further into the painting and at the same time adds a very tactile experience. Katherine Wood creates paintings that are half way to becoming real a cloud and being paint – something like us – stuck between frequency of the ego and the soul. Are we real or are we just energy? One can see on one hand this is actually paint textured across a canvas – but on another attempting to portray a cloud – the reality of it questioned and so with both energy in the hanging.   The contrasts of smooth vs. texture, the infinite abstract sky verse the realistic tiny symbol of man or tree and the play between dark and light all create a dramatic stage to pose the question of what is this life really all about? And so; “The future remains uncertain and so it should, for it is the canvas upon which we paint our desires. Thus always the human condition faces a beautifully empty canvas. We possess only this moment in which to dedicate ourselves continuously to the sacred presence which we share and create.” Frank Herbert

AC:  What is something about yourself that not many people would know about?

KW: When I started my art career over 20 years ago, I initially painted under a pseudonym of Thrianka Wood for over a year as a professional artist as I didn’t have enough belief in my work.  “My mind used to poison me, but now it is my medicine.” I use to think I was a vehicle for my art but now I realise my art is a vehicle for me. Just in the simplicity and purity of using my art as a means from which to transcend from this reality. It is my meditation that becomes a product of my own pure energy. Working together we mutually benefit. The more I do it, the more in love with it I become and the knowing that I can tap into that space just by holding a brush is a very feel good space to be in. In allowing myself to consistently and consciously ask myself “how am I feeling” becomes my daily routine and through that a very rewarding living in the now.  I am so grateful I get to make beautiful things and in an essence these allow me to create a beautiful life.  Through art I have come to realise we are creators of our own existence, through painting my thoughts silenced and the oil becomes a voice for that of my silenced mind – a pure beautiful state of energy captured on canvas.

 AC:  In your landscape works, we’ve noticed a pattern of a little tree or man somewhere in the painting. What does this represent to you?

KW:  Everything is made up of energy, we can never be disconnected from everything around us because we are all the same thing.  That sky is part of us and us it – connected.  The parody in my work is that as alone as that figure appears – and alone as we may feel (we are born alone, we die alone) we are all ultimately one and the same thing we are everything and everything is us. When and if we learn to respect this, great change can happen. I use the sky as my main theme as it is infinite. And not only infinite but also infinitely changing – the perfect subject of abstract expression.  As is the universe within each one of us.  I am no longer who I was yesterday in fact “I” have ceased to exist all together.”  And so the basic thread that runs through all of Katherine’s artwork is an attempt to portray to the viewer their relevant insignificance and that to lead a life with less ego is a happier life (this is achieved through the metaphor of the little man or tree).  Katherine’s artwork “In the Flow” is a body of work that is on a quest to answer the question “what is the individual self?” and how can we ultimately achieve the idea of “no self” which would allow us to find happiness. “The world is a vast and mysterious place in which we as individuals are such tiny, intense little beings.  We are participating in a fabric of being that we do not understand.”   Frank Herbert

By paying more attention to nature we are able to become more conscious. By being in nature we are able to step outside of ourselves -ultimately we are just an extension of it.  We are not separate.  If we don’t do this we become engulfed in our ego.  The ego is driven by many human emotions to name a few; shame (feelings you are less than), guilt (feeling you need to repair something), envy (wanting to destroy) and jealousy (wanting to compete). We need to conquer these to ultimately achieve happiness.   In this body of work “In the Flow” Katherine reflects an ideal that allows us as individuals to contemplate a place of no self.

AC:  What is it about the ocean that excites you and influences your paintings?

KW:  There are so many aspects to the ocean that are exciting.  Its daunting width and depth, simply stands for life itself. It may be quite calm, but it can become raging and even deadly in an instant, with the waves representing the sudden obstacles life throws our way. I love the oceans calm presence and sense of space, a place to reflect on the past, and to dream and hope about the future. A place to look ahead and imagine what could be waiting on the horizon, actually or metaphorically. The sea can mirror our mood, as if it knows we are feeling sad, despondent and bleak. Or as if it knows we are full of rage and fury. Or as if it knows we just need to be seen and to be heard and to be in the presence of another.  The ocean has become one of my favourite symbols since moving to the Sunshine coast.  It is  a symbol to represent life and its hardships. It stands for the soul, the subconscious, emotion, nature, a primal state, nature, the “good” parts of existence, dreams, fantasy and more. Alternatively different from portraying a peaceful ocean.  I use the imagery of the ocean to portray the inner conflict of a person; and the image of the stormy ocean, the high, crashing waves represent overwhelming emotions, that threaten to “drown” the person.  The beach symbolises the meeting between your two states of mind – the rational (Sand) and the emotional (Water); or the place of transition between your physical self and your spiritual self. And even so the “threat” of the looming wave seems so real the silhouette of the man confidently, calmly walks on. Taking anchor in the peace of one’s mind and so reflecting on the idea that if one can find control of your thoughts so can you find control over any of life’s hardships. The ocean also represents the subconscious, the unknown parts of the mind, the dark, hidden depths of the ocean standing for unknown, unexplored thoughts, emotions, feelings, that are not visible on the surface. it’s a symbol for the person facing his own subconsciousness, going deep into his own emotions and his mind. The ocean also stands for the soul. The tranquil, inner part of oneself, that lies at the core. The images of the still, Deep Ocean represents the deepness of the soul. What I find to be the most important parallelism between the sea and life in general is the unpredictability of both. A sudden change in weather brings upon giant waves that make it impossible to swim forward, and the only solution is to go back to shore, much like a sudden obstacle in life makes it impossible to move forward and the only solution is to go back a few steps. The point of course is to not give up, and keep going, even if ultimately it doesn’t give you what you worked so hard to achieve.  A wave is unstoppable, a force of nature that sweeps over everything in its path. It indicates strength and inevitability, but also a lack of thoughtful discrimination and futility of resistance. The sea as is water is fluid and can slip through one’s fingers, refusing to be grasped. Similarly, so is life; impossible to contain and clearly define.  To me the ocean represents the idea that for one to move forward we need to master the idea of persistence (that this life is not discriminatory) but that we need to keep trying.

Katherine Wood’s current collection of artwork is on exhibition at Red Hill Gallery, 61 Musgrave Road Red Hill, Brisbane until Sunday 30 July 2017. Make sure you visit the Gallery and its amazing team.

©  Red Hill Gallery

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Artist Q & A – ‘Stretching Potential’ by Bill Powell

After completing a four week residency in Vallauris , France and returning to Australia, we at ArtChat were fortunate enough to catch up with Leading Australian Ceramist Bill Powell and discuss all things clay in preparation for his exhibition “Stretching Potential” at Red Hill Gallery.

  AC:  The ceramics in your current exhibition at Red Hill Gallery are stunningly different from the pieces in your last show. What inspired you to change techniques?

BP:  When I first arrived in Vallauris , France I was conscience of the limits of the four weeks of the residency so I got straight into my usual crystal glazed work. The workshop and kilns there are much smaller than my own studio so I soon found that I had completed my tasks and had some spared time on my hands. I used this time and the lack of the normal daily life stresses to experiment and explore a surface texture technique I had seen once before in the US. It was all about the raw clay itself and was very different to the highly glazed surfaces that I had made a habit of. I found this creative freedom to be invigorating and so fresh and new. Since returning to Australia I have developed this further. To the point of this body of work that I am proud and excited to be showing here at Red Hill gallery

AC:  What challenges did you face creating this series of pottery, and how did you overcome them?

BP:  The greatest challenge has been translating this technique into our available Australian clay bodies. In this exhibition I have used six or seven separate clays from varied sources and all with their own peculiar characteristics. Gaining an understanding of each one and how to get the best out of them has been a journey of trial, error and revelation, a process that I find both enjoyable and rewarding.

AC:  When you’re not creating, what do you enjoy doing in your spare time?

BP:  Potting can be a very physical activity and places stresses on the body. I have formed a lap swimming habit that helps maintain a level of physical health and also promotes a mindfulness that I find beneficial. I also enjoy photography, travel, and writing and, when I have a chance, playing guitar. Sadly, spare time has been very rare lately.

AC:  Did your time in Vallauris, France influence the way you created these vases?

BP:  It was during my time in Vallauris that I first attempted this stretching and layering clay technique. I was introduced to the local dark manganese clay bodies and pure white porcelains of the local area and decided to combine the two. Interestingly the results have more to say about our Australian landscapes than any direct French reflections. So often we see what is right in our own backyard far clearer from a distance.

AC:  Do you have plans to travel for your art research again?

BP:  I currently have no specific plans for further research travel but I do harbour desires to visit either Japan or China or both if possible. Both countries have well developed traditions in ceramics and a history that is both alluring and intriguing. Specifically the Porcelain works of China.

AC:  How long did it take you to develop your wheel throwing skills?

BP:  I have been throwing on the potter’s wheel since my first encounters with clay. That was back in the late 70’s. My skills are all self taught and have been greatly improved by many decades of production throwing. In fact I still throw production two days a week, along with teaching and running workshops in my techniques.

AC:  If you could invite any artist in history over for dinner, who would it be and why?

BP:  There are so many. If I can only have one and I could overcome the language barrier, then I think I would like to share the time with Spanish maestro Antoni Gaudi. I admire his visual intelligence and unique designs but most of all , I would like to gain an insight into his mindset and how he was able to swim against established schools of design and confidently forge a  vision that is both outstanding and awe inspiring.

AC:  What do the vessels in this exhibition represent to you?

BP:  I have an overall perception of this body of work as a metaphor for personal development. I have explored multiple varied clay bodies and created each piece from the inside out. With this sodium silicate technique, the outer surface is stretched to within its breaking point. The risk is that the internal pressures when forming the shape can, in fact, go too far and tear, leaving the pot unrecoverable. The final result reflects these stresses and is evident in the textured surfaces. Much like life’s personal pressures that we all bare and internalise and which form our characters from within. After all, there is very little personal growth to be achieved from the sanctuary of our comfort zone.

Bill Powell’s current collection of glazed and unglazed ceramics are on exhibition at Red Hill Gallery, 61 Musgrave Road Red Hill, Brisbane until Sunday 30 July 2017. Make sure you visit the Gallery and its amazing team.

©  Red Hill Gallery

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EMBRACING THE THIN BLACK LINE

On Saturday 10 June 2017 Australian Figurative artist John Maitland returns to Red Hill Gallery, Brisbane with his latest exhibition “The Thin Black Line”. Maitland’s skillfully executed oil and acrylic paintings are informed by figurative expressionism and imbued with rigorous colour and texture to denote emotive nuance. The artwork achieves poignancy through a unique perspective which resonates throughout his cohesive presentation.

From a technical perspective, the Thin Black Line has always been an important element in my work. It not only delineates parts, or all, of figures and landscape, but is a pivotal part of the composition itself, etching an emotional track through the painting.” John Maitland

Maitland’s innovative style is created and conceived outdoors, exposed to the elements and the extreme heat of the sun. The built-up layers in his paintings are encouraged to crack and fissure giving an aged appearance resembling archaic surfaces. Broad, sweeping brushstrokes and the strength of his paint application give rawness and beauty in an understated way.

The Thin Black Line is used in conjunction with the natural movement of the hand, like a sensor of my own emotions. In more recent works I use the thin black line to incorporate borders around the perimeter and bring the work together. This exhibition painted exclusively for Red Hill Gallery, showcases an acknowledgement of what have become personal motifs of how I express myself. The ballerinas, a personal favourite of mine, are rarely depicted dancing. My interest is in capturing the apprehension before the performance itself, or quite simply, the elation or sheer exhaustion experienced after a performance. The kite, mother and child, boy and horse, all celebrate innocence, exuberance, freedom, and emotion.” John Maitland

John Maitland’s Exhibition ‘The Thin Black Line’ will open on Saturday 10 June and continue until Sunday 25 June 2017 at Red Hill Gallery, 61 Musgrave Road, Red Hill, QLD.

For further information about the gallery and its represented artists, please visit redhillgallery.com.au

©  Red Hill Gallery

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PIERS BATEMAN Retrospective Exhibition

A passionate love of the landscape drove Piers Bateman to paint his beloved country from the heart of the red centre to the coastal scrubland; quintessential Australian images. In September 2015 Piers Bateman tragically died in a boating accident off the coast of New South Wales, a sad loss to the art world within Australia and Internationally. On Friday 12 May, Red Hill Gallery, Brisbane will open its doors for the Exclusive Retrospective Exhibition of Bateman’s artwork.

Piers Bateman undertook several trans-Australian painting expeditions, bringing us the vivid paintings of remote Australian landscapes for which his work is known. He featured in over sixty major solo exhibitions throughout his lifetime, both in Australia and aboard. His artwork hangs on the walls of the Reserve Bank of Australia, Melbourne University and the conference room in the Australian Embassy in Washington, to name just a few.

An avid adventurer, Bateman travelled abroad often to sail and paint in areas such as the Greek Islands, the Mediterranean, and much of Europe. Bateman had the knack to make a home wherever he found himself. He was invited as the Australian representative at MAC 21, a contemporary Arts Fair in Spain and later in China, was offered and accepted a position at the Shanghai Institute of Visual Art (S.I.V.A.) as an Honorary Professor. Prior to this, the Australian Embassy in Washington hosted a large collection of Bateman’s Australian works.

To quote Piers Bateman “Art is to me the most important thing after survival needs, by art I include, of course, all the arts. Art is the seduction of the senses. Art is to be explored, enjoyed, questioned and collected.”

Red Hill Gallery Director, Margaret Campbell-Ryder, reflects on Bateman’s talent for re-creating the nuances of Australian landscapes. “Many artists try to replicate our Aussie bush and sea scapes on canvas, but few achieved the delicate balance that Piers was able to deliver, time and time again,” Campbell-Ryder said. “The way he blended similar colours to create depth and mood around sweeping and still lands or windy seas is a skill that he owned.”

The Piers Bateman Retrospective Exhibition will open on Friday 12 May and continue until Sunday 4 June 2017.

For further information about the gallery and its represented artists, please visit redhillgallery.com.au

Red Hill Gallery is located at 61 Musgrave Road, Red Hill, Brisbane QLD, and is open seven days.

©  Red Hill Gallery

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BRISBANE ARTIST TODD WHISSON PUSHES THE ‘LIMITLESS’ BOUNDARIES

On Friday 12 May, Red Hill Gallery will open its doors to ‘Limitless’ the latest exhibition by Todd Whisson. For Whisson, painting is in his blood. Son of esteemed artist Eric Whisson, this Brisbane artist gave up his job as a professional framer in 2003 and turned his talents to the canvas fulltime. In recent years Whisson has also taken up formal study in the arts and his style has since evolved.

Whisson recently commented on his latest exhibition ‘Limitless’ stating: “this work positions me from realist art to conceptual art in order to examine expressive values. With this exhibition, I have been particularly focused on painting from life hypnotic objects sporadically captured in a fleeting moment of time. I feel a certain impulse to paint what I see, yet incensed enough not to replicate the painterly image values before me, but authenticate my experience.”

His recent work has developed markedly, taking an abstract approach which continues to reflect his skill in traditional techniques yet has enabled him to communicate more than a visual representation, and has elevated his passion and vision to another level of skill and perception.

Whisson applies a “en plein air’ style of painting to the spectacular coastal and landscape scenes of Queensland. His ability to balance light with shadow captures the ambience of the Australian Landscape.

“As an artist for 28 years, sharing my knowledge and experience with others is an extremely gratifying part of my journey.” Todd Whisson

Limitless is exhibiting at Red Hill Gallery, 61 Musgrave Road from 12 May to 4 June 2017.

Sales commence prior to opening and the exhibition will finish on Sunday 4 June 2017. For further information about the gallery and its represented artists, please visit redhillgallery.com.au

Red Hill Gallery is located at 61 Musgrave Road, Red Hill, Brisbane QLD, and is open seven days.

©  Red Hill Gallery

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A TREASURE TROVE OF ARTWORK

Combining interior, urban and country landscapes, ‘Treasured Places’ showcases the colourful world that artists live in and are inspired to paint. Nick Olsen, Tim Graham and Ken Strong take us on a journey through time and place, with their interpretation of life around them. ‘Treasured Places’ opens on Friday 7 April 2017 at Red Hill Gallery in Musgrave Road and is sure to attract art lovers to view the much loved icon scenes of Brisbane and surrounds.

Brisbane artist, Nick Olsen’s colourful and evocative landscapes relate to an expression of a sense of place. He likes to focus on images of the simple things in life, hoping these subjects allow the viewer to relate to their own experiences. He believes this is an important aspect of enjoying art.

Tim Graham started painting at an early age and currently resides on the Sunshine Coast. He paints in an impressionist style where his main emphasis is colour. “I look out the studio window into the garden and trees and everything is full of sunlight and the brightest of colours, it all looks so happy and full of life’’.

From the beautiful surrounds of Northern NSW, artist Ken Strong says “The more I paint, the more I am absorbed with the concept of composition. It is everything. To determine the perfect harmony is to be able to recreate the sensation of a subject, this may impact the emotions or just stimulate the pleasure of observation.”

“Treasured Places’ combines the artwork of three exceptional and distinct artists. Visitors to Red Hill Gallery can immerse themselves in this visual journey through urban, country and interior and enjoy the colourful wonderment that has been created.”  Margaret Campbell-Ryder, Gallery Director and Curator

Sales commence prior to opening and the exhibition will close on Sunday 30 April 2017. For further information about the gallery and its represented artists, please visit redhillgallery.com.au

Red Hill Gallery is located at 61 Musgrave Road, Red Hill, Brisbane QLD, and is open seven days.

©  Red Hill Gallery

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KALEIDOSCOPE OF ARTWORK TO ENTICE

Starting the exhibition calendar for 2017 at Red Hill Gallery, ‘The March Collection’ features a selection of artwork to entice Art lovers and collectors alike with a kaleidoscope of paintings especially curated for this event. Officially opening on Friday 3 March 2017, the exhibition will feature artwork by eight individually talented artists.

Red Hill Gallery is thrilled to announce it is now representing a cross section of new artists including:

Michel Canetti is acclaimed as one of France’s leading fashion illustrators. As a prestigious French artist and illustrator, he has worked with some of the world’s largest fashion houses and magazines. Canett’s creativity deals with his insight into fashion and the appeal of the female charm, visible in each of his breathtaking paintings.

John Harmon has a reputation that precedes him, having worked in house for both Warner Bros. and Disney as an animation background painter and exclusively as a freelance illustrator for Walt Disney.  An accomplished fine artist, Harmon has explored his own unique and quirky style in the art world.

Drew Gregory is represented internationally and has won numerous prestigious national Art awards. He is an artist at the peak of his career with a deep understanding and love of his subject matter. His Australian landscapes are inviting and addictive, transporting you to another world far away from the bustle of city life.

Joining them will be five of Red Hill Gallery’s highly regarded painters. Australian landscape watercolour artist Ruby Eaves; representational oil painter and dry media artist Jeff Gant and landscape and fauna artist Carole Foster with her paintings of cheeky birds; John Turton is a colourist who paints vibrant impressionistic landscapes and Louis Dalozzo’s bold paintings reflect his love of the land surrounding the Kimberley’s.

Sales commence prior to opening and the exhibition will finish on Sunday 26 March 2017. For further information about the gallery and its represented artists, please visit redhillgallery.com.au

Red Hill Gallery is located at 61 Musgrave Road, Red Hill, Brisbane QLD, and is open seven days.

©  Red Hill Gallery

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The Year of the Rooster – 2017 Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year, known in modern Chinese as the “Spring Festival” in Mainland China, is an important Chinese festival celebrated at the turn of the traditional lunisolar Chinese calendar. Celebrations traditionally run from the evening preceding the first day, to the Lantern Festival on the 15th day of the first calendar month. The first day of the New Year falls on the new moon between 21 January and 20 February. In 2017, the first day of the Chinese New Year is on Saturday, 28 January, initiating another year of the Rooster.

Interesting Facts

  • People pray and wish for good harvest on this auspicious day and prepare for the farm work ahead that starts soon after the new year.
  • It’s a long 7 day celebration and public holiday is observed for the whole week.
  • The 12 zodiac animals in the Chinese zodiac cycle are – the Rat, Ox, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Goat, Monkey, Rooster, Dog, and the Pig.

The Year of the Rooster

  • Years of the Rooster include 1933, 1945, 1957, 1969, 1981, 1993, 2005, 2017, and 2029.
  • Roosters are Energetic, smart, hardworking, trustworthy and brave people.

Lucky Rooster Predictions

  • Lucky numbers: 5, 7, and 8
  • Lucky days: the 4th and 26th of any Chinese lunar month
  • Lucky months: the 2nd, 5th, and 11th Chinese lunar months.
  • Lucky directions: south, southeast
  • Lucky flowers: gladiola, cockscomb

Rooster Compatibility

  • Roosters are most Compatible with Snakes and the OX
  • Worst with Pig, Rat, Horse and Rabbit

Get into Red Hill Gallery and find yourself a Rooster today.

©  Red Hill Gallery

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“A Kaleidoscope of Colour for the Festive Season”

Red Hill Gallery presents the talents of four diverse leading ladies for their final exhibition for the year. Collectively their creative artwork is innovative and refreshingly evocative. The exhibition “Kaleidoscope of Colour” opens at Red Hill Gallery on Friday 2 December 2016.

artchatchristinereillyChristine Reilly is a respected and imaginative Queensland artist, who strives to portray her evocative images with colour and movement, making them come alive on the canvas. Her work demonstrates a long-held love of travel, people-watching, local city scenes and beachscapes. It chronicles not only the progression of her subjects and style but also her own journey as an artist and woman.

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Larissa Blake creates vibrant and energetic works inspired by the everyday, her love of travel and interiors. Larissa was exposed to Art from early childhood through her mother, professional artist, Loretta Blake. Her work references the domestic and feminine domains in a celebratory context, using an exuberant, joyful, uplifting colour palette.

artchatlorettablake
Loretta Blake whose passion is classic art, has had a distinguished career in Australia and overseas, working in oils as well as water based paints.  Flowers, a first love of subject matter, gradually gave way to the exploration of people and landscape, whilst still expressing vibrancy and spontaneity.

artchatkarenatkins
Karen Atkins is constantly amazed by possibilities, enormous skies, sumptuous colours and extraordinary relationships between people, animals, land and art. Karen’s paintings evolve from experiences and observations and explore, with romance and whimsy, the places our choices may take us.

“Throughout our 30th Anniversary year, we have been privileged to present some outstanding Art Exhibitions from our wonderful stable of Artists. Thank you for joining us on this journey.”
Margaret Campbell-Ryder, Gallery Director and Curator

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ICONIC BRISBANE ART GALLERY CELEBRATES MILESTONE

Throughout the year Red Hill Gallery has been celebrating its 30th Anniversary and on Wednesday 31st August the gallery presented its major Anniversary Exhibition of Excellence.

A number of successful artists, many with International reputations, will be exhibiting including Jamie Boyd, Mel Brigg, Regina Noakes, John Maitland, David Hart, Conchita Carambano, John Beeman, Bill Powell and Dean Rusling.

Preview 30th Opt 2

Since first opening its doors in 1986 the Red Hill Gallery has remained at the same premises, 61 Musgrave Road, in a building over a century old which has become a part of Brisbane’s historical fabric.

The property was built in the early 1900s by the Whitehouse family to house their famous organ business, supplying organs to most city halls, civic buildings, churches and cathedrals throughout Australia and New Zealand. It subsequently became the home of many other businesses including a confectionary manufacturer, a sound studio and a printing press.

For the last 30 years, thousands of paintings, handmade glass, sculptures, jewellery and ceramics have been purchased from this quaint little ‘red’ building with the green awning on Musgrave Road.

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With highly-successful careers in the retail and marketing sector, Graham and Margaret Campbell-Ryder purchased the gallery in 1998. According to Mr Campbell-Ryder the Red Hill Gallery’s longevity and success is due to many factors however one of the most crucial ingredients has been customer service. “Regardless of what business you’re in, if you don’t provide excellent service from start to finish then you won’t stand the test of time,” Mr Campbell-Ryder said.

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Seeing art in the flesh is an enriching experience, there is colour, beauty, passion, thoughtfulness and intensity in art that is soothing to some and exciting to others. It’s an experience that should be enjoyed by all. “At Red Hill Gallery we look forward to continuing the tradition of providing excellent customer service and welcoming clients to the gallery during our 30th Anniversary celebrations and for many years to come” said Margaret Campbell-Ryder.

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The 30th Anniversary Exhibition officially opens on Wednesday August 31 at 6pm and continues daily until 25 September 2016.

 

©  Red Hill Gallery

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ArtChat [Blog Interview #87] – David Hinchliffe

ArtChat recently spent 5 minutes with Brisbane artist David Hinchliffe, to discuss his upcoming exhibition and recent trips overseas. His latest exhibition at Red Hill Gallery features the energy of New York City, the chaos of Havana, the romance of Paris, together with the architecture of London and iconic Brisbane landmarks.

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AC: What’s your philosophy about art? 

DH: Art doesn’t change the world, my opinion however, it does change the way we see the world.  That’s my job as an artist: to help people see the world.

AC: You have painted so many different parts of the world, do you have a favourite location to paint?

DH:  I keep finding new places to paint, in addition to my regular painting visits to New York, London, Paris, Sydney and Melbourne.  I’ve just come back from running a painting workshop in Bali and that was special.  But I have to say the more exotic destinations like Marrakech and Fez in Morocco and Havana in Cuba are still my favourites…along with Brisbane of course.

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AC: We loved the photos of your recent trip to Bali, can we expect to see some of your Bali paintings in the near future?

DH:  Absolutely. I especially loved the Balinese people and culture, I’d never been to Bali before. I guess I was put off by so many Australians going there. But I was surprised to find most of the people hadn’t been corrupted by the commercialism and tourism that has swamped a few parts of Bali. It was painting the people that I really enjoyed most, partly because my first love is figurative painting and partly because the people were so lovely and willing to be painted. (See pic of Balinese girl at Candidasa.) I’d be delighted to share those paintings in the months ahead.

Bali Painting

AC: It has been hinted that there is going to be a double David Hinchliffe exhibition in the future, can you tell us more? 

DH:  It all started a few years ago when there was some internet confusion about David Hinchliffe artist (Brisbane) and David Hinchliffe artist (Somerset UK). I got in touch with the U.K. David and he and his wife Patsy invited me to their home and studio in lovely Somerset.  That was about 4 years ago and the friendship has grown and each year we visit the Summer Exhibition at the Royal Academy. (See pic.) We even have very similar painting styles, although he has an OBE after his name!  I’ve invited him and Patsy to Brisbane and I’m hopeful that might result in a joint exhibition — “Two David Hinchliffe’s are better than One” is the working title!

The Other Hinchliffe

AC:  What do you like most about the Luxembourg Gardens?

DH: Luxembourg gardens in Paris has been attracting artists for 2 centuries, particularly the impressionists at the end of the 19th century. It’s just down the road from the Pantheon and near the Sorbonne but its attraction is the relief it offers to the local built environment. I love the cafe in among the tightly planted rows of trees on the Pantheon side of the park where the local head waiter terrorises customers. I know him now and I know his gruff wiles and ways, so I enjoy observing how new patrons respond to his very Parisian style of ‘waiting’. I’ve sat at that cafe many times painting the dramatic light and shade and the shapes of people moving in and out of those regimented rows of trees.

AC:  In your current exhibition you have a small number of paintings (for example Marrakesh) that are different from you usual style, can we expect to see more of this?

DH: My ambition as an artist is to try to capture the personality of the cities I visit. No two cities are alike. Parts of some cities might resemble parts of others, but I hope I am able to reflect their individuality in slightly different styles.

AC:  What style of art do you personally collect?

DH:  I don’t collect a lot of paintings partly because I don’t have room enough to hang them!  I do like representative painting – I like a painting to look like something. However I also love pure abstraction, paintings that don’t have any specific elements. I find I enjoy a painting that holds my attention. It needs to represent something. My favourite paintings were painted by my father when he was just a young teenager. (See pic of David with his father’s paintings, painted when his father was approx 15 years old)

David's Fathers Paintings

AC:  What was the lightbulb moment that made you switch from politics to painting fulltime?

DH:  It wasn’t so much a ‘switch’ as a ‘reprioritising’. I’ve been painting continuously since I was a teenager including on my holidays when I was in politics. That’s how I was able to have more than 60 exhibitions by the time I retired. I’d had enough of politics and the dumbing down that has been an increasing feature of political discussion. I’m now lucky enough to have had just over 4 joy filled years of uninterrupted full-time painting, undisturbed by the madness or mediocrity of politics.

AC:  Having travelled and exhibited all around the world, why do you call Brisbane home?

DH:  No matter what great times I have painting in extraordinary parts of this world, I have never returned to Brisbane wishing that that I’d stayed longer in the city or cities I’ve been visiting. I always return with a sense of gratitude that I belong to such a special place with such good sub-tropical weather, magnificent parks with Poinciana’s and Jacarandas, its unique traditional Queenslander architecture,  and incomparable coffee!

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David Hinchliffe’s current collection of artwork is on exhibition at Red Hill Gallery, 61 Musgrave Road Red Hill, Brisbane until 21 August 2016. Make sure you visit the Gallery and its amazing team.

©  Red Hill Gallery

 

 

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